POST-DOC POSITION IN DEVELOPMENTAL CELL BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

Position available (starting June-December 2024) in Pascal Thérond laboratory to functionally characterize secreted molecules with morphogenetic activity in Drosophila. Morphogen signals are indispensable during embryonic development to regulate cell fate and tissue organization in a well-controlled manner in time and space. However, the cellular mechanisms in place to control secretion and extra-cellular transport of these signals still need to be solved. 

The post-doctoral project aims to gain further insight into the trafficking, secretion and extracellular spread of Hedgehog proteins, both at the intercellular and inter-organ level, using cell biology and genetic technics. In vivo imaging and single molecule tracking (in collaboration with computational science lab) has also been developped on our tissue models and will be further used to investigate the dynamics of Hedgehog release and spreading.

Interested candidates should have strong knowledge of, and experience in fly genetics, cell biology and optic microscopy (confocal/spinning disc). The position is funded with an attractive salary of 3,520 euros gross for 2 years in duration with possible 4 years extension. Candidates must have a Ph.D. degree, and can be nationals of any country. 

Applicants must hold a university doctorate (PhD). Applicants must have defended the doctoral thesis not before April 2020. The deadline for submitting applications is April 8, 2024. Applicants will be interviewed in April. The start of the contract is set no later than January 30, 2025.

Candidates should send a Curriculum Vitae and a list of three referees to: 

Dr. Pascal Thérond, CNRS-UMR 6543, Université de Nice-Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France. Phone: (33) 4 92076446. Email: therond@unice.fr

Selected references: Briscoe and Thérond, Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. Vol. 14, 2013; Matusek et al., Nature 2014 Dec 4;516(7529): 99-103; D’Angelo et al., Dev. Cell 2015 Feb. 9 ; 32, 290-303. Gore et al., Development 2021 Mar 9;148(5): dev191791. Hurbain et al., Current Biology. 2022 vol. 32(2): p361-373.